Henri Matisse

Henri Matisse (1869 - 1954) had a remarkable career. His mastery of the expressive language of colour and drawing, which spanned over a half-century, won him recognition as a leading figure in modern art, and saw him regarded as one of the most influential artists of the twentieth century.

His stylistic innovations fundamentally altered the course of modern art and affected the art of several generations of younger painters. His vast oeuvre encompassed painting, drawing, sculpture, graphic arts (as diverse as etchings, linocuts, lithographs, and aquatints), paper cut-outs, and book illustration. His varied subjects comprised landscape, still life, portraiture, domestic and studio interiors, and particularly focused on the female figure.

Due to ill health in his late sixties, Matisse turned to an entirely new approach to making work - cutting shapes from painted paper. Matisse first used cut paper shapes to work out the arrangement of objects in his paintings. While working on a painting, he often made sketches exploring alternative points of view or versions of the composition. Cutting is a way of drawing and sculpting at the same time where scissors both create the outline of the figure and carve contours into it. This resulted in some of the most iconic works of the 20th century.

Belgravia Gallery has a collection of vintage lithographs by Matisse, some of his last works created. They are unsigned, iconic images.

We can also source other works. Contact us for information.

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